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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the replenishing of arms going into gaza. i think there is probably from the hamas side with egypt as egypt is probably promising the opening of passages which up until now at the descriptions have not really opened. and there may be something to do with what the israelis will be allowing into gaza, the fact is the israelis allowed much more into gaza, they still want to be able to check ships to be sure that big weapons aren't coming in that way but i think that is probably the outline that hamas probably also wants commitments from the israelis about not going after their leadership. >> elliott, do you think this is a deal that the israelis will believe in and think acceptable for them? >> i do. i think one really critical part of it is the egyptian side, that is policing that border, something that the number rec regime did not do. the egyptians will promise to do that and the question then is, will the new government do it? and keep at least the long range iranian rockets from entering gaza? will they really police it and really close the tunnels i think that is going to be quite criti
but it's the implication of the arab spring and today egypt is ruled not by president mubarak, whose regime shared israel's concern and adversity to hamas but by the muslim brotherhood that treats hamas as its podigy, its kind of protectorate in gaza. and qatar -- in a similar fashion qatar is becoming more and more the financial backer of hamas in gaza. so you can argue that the good news is that hamas is further away from iran and from syria. the more radical governments in the region. closer to egypt and qatar who are less radical, re western oriented, more pro-american and with open channels to israel. >> rose: so what do you think is going to happen? >> i think a new cease-fire will be put in place. i hope it will happen within the next 24 hours to prevent and avoid and do without the ground invasion with its deadly cast and then whoever takes t place of jbarras the new leader of hamas will have to impose a cease-fire. while at the same time israel will have to let go some of its blockade of gaza. and i think both sides will try the best face-saving formulas which they can deplo
in egypt, in syria we don't have a process yet. >> rose: why not? >> because you know, the government is entrenched in a kind of denial position. saying that this is not the arab spring. this is-- . >> rose: terrorist. >> terrorist and conspiracy. >> rose: right. >> from outside. and of course the opposition think of themselves as a revolution. so they are not talking about the same problem. >> rose: and they've got the problem that syrians are killing syrians which always divides a huge mountain to provide. >> a lot of people are angry with me because i have called it civil war. but i'm afraid that is what it is. people were angry with me in baghdad when i said the same thing. so yes, it is, it is, it has a lot of what the revolution has but it has also an aspect of civil war. i think that is what is to be said to the security council sill that you have like in any conflict you have circles. the innercircle which is the locals, the region and the international. >> rose: right. >> security council is, has had a lot of difficulty coming together. yet it is probably the easiest ring to
to negotiate with the muslim brotherhood new president of egypt who doesn't en kw where all the rooms are in the presidential palace, you have to deal with a raging civil war in syria and an israeli government that, you know, no one knows basically who is the majority anymore let alone xab what it stands for. so this is not a great time to be secretary of state. i've said if you want to do national security in this country ask to be secretary of education. >> rose: thank you for joining us. see you tomorrow night captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
awakening" that began nearly two years ago. bringing the rise of elected islamist governments in egypt and elsewhere -- and a raging civil war in syria. here, too, stark rhetoric masks murky differences. romney says he'd do more to arm syria's rebels but has not said the u.s. would do the arming. the obama white house has resisted doing so, for fear heavy weapons would end up with anti-american jihadists or terrorists. vali nasr is dean of the johns hopkins school of advanced international studies. >> the differences between the candidates at the moment do not appear very large because our response to the arab spring has been fairly consistent across both political parties. >> in afghanistan, likewise, the two candidates agree on withdrawing the remaining 68,000 combat troops by the end of 2014. and after 2,000 american dead there, 4,000 in iraq, and tens of thousands wounded, neither candidate, much less the american public, seems to have the stomach for another major ground war. the danger in all this, says vali nasr, is that after all this post-9/11 turmoil and war, and the killing
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)